Honey and Balsamic Glazed Salmon Spirals

September 5, 2008 at 12:49 am 1 comment

Got your attention? It sure had ours when we watched Ming Tsai and Michael Chiarello create this masterpiece on Simply Ming last week. Honey and Balsamic Glazed Salmon Spirals with Sesame-Orange Spinach…sounds heavenly, no? The Sage and Rosemary Oven-Baked Potatoes are our own addition.

Ming’s show is based on the idea of east meets west, and every week he pairs two core ingredients that are used in each dish. He also calls on another chef to create a recipe using the core ingredients, inviting viewers into the envious kitchens of famed chefs such as Michael Chiarello, who created this dish.

The core ingredients for the salmon and spinach were balsamic vinegar and sesame oil. The best tips we learned on the program were not to overdo it on the sesame oil (a little goes a long way) and that salmon need not be served piping hot. It’s better to let it rest to really let the flavors meld together.

Honey and Balsamic Glazed Salmon Spiral with Sesame-Orange Spinach

Serves four.

  • 1 center cut salmon filet, skin, belly, and pin bones removed (about 1 1/2 to 2 lbs.)
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon gray salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon dry mustard powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 20 ounces spinach
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons sliced garlic
  • Zest of 1 orange
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon mixed white and black sesame seeds

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Wash, rinse, and stem the spinach. Heat the 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large 14-inch sauté pan over high heat. When hot and just beginning to smoke, add the sliced garlic and cook until golden brown, then add the orange zest and spinach. Cook the spinach, tossing frequently until fully wilted and tender. Remove from the heat, drizzle in the sesame oil, and check for seasoning. Divide the spinach, and quickly wipe out the pan with a paper towel. Spread about 1/3 of the total spinach on a plate. Cover the remaining 2/3 spinach with foil and reserve warm.

In a small bowl, mix together the honey and balsamic vinegar.

Using a sharp knife cut the salmon into 4 lengthwise strips (from collar to tail). Lay the strips of salmon out flat and season on all sides with salt, pepper, and the mustard powder. Line the top of each salmon strip with equal amounts of the plated spinach. Start from one end and roll the salmon up into a spiral, secure each with two wooden skewers. Place the sesame seed mixture onto a plate, and dip each side of the salmon spirals into the seeds.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in the 14-inch pan that was wiped out after the spinach. When hot, but not quite smoking, add the salmon spirals and brown for about 2 minutes. Turn the salmon over and allow to brown for about 1 minute on the other side. Brush about 1-2 tablespoons of the honey/balsamic mixture over the salmon and place in the oven for about 6-7 minutes. Remove the salmon from the oven and brush again with the honey/balsamic. Arrange the reserved, warm spinach on a large platter or each of 4 plates. Remove the skewers from the salmon and place on top of the warm spinach, spoon a bit more of the honey balsamic over the salmon, and drizzle little more sesame oil over the top. 

Sage and Rosemary Oven-Baked Potatoes

This is a very relaxed recipe we threw together after smelling the sage from our garden. Modify to suit your tastes.

  • Yukon Gold potatoes
  • Dried sage leaves
  • Dried rosemary
  • Lemon
  • Olive oil
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 

In a pestle and mortar, mash together the herbs, lemon juice, and a good glug of olive oil. Brush potato wedges with the mixture, and place wedges on a greased baking sheet. Bake for 20 minutes. Remove from oven, and turn wedges; cook for 10 to 15 minutes, or until tender inside and oh-so-crispy on the outside.

Mangia!

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Entry filed under: Main courses. Tags: , , , , .

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1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. wheereDum  |  December 11, 2009 at 8:06 pm

    Authentic words, some true words man. Made my day!

    Reply

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